GlobeMed: An Engineering Perspective

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By John Galyas Before I stepped foot on campus to begin my freshman year at Northwestern, I knew I wanted to join GlobeMed. I had spent the last few weeks of the long summer before my freshman year Googling anything and everything about Northwestern in an admittedly overeager and futile attempt at preparing for the transition to college life. However, it was during these browsing sessions that I first discovered GlobeMed. At that point in my life, I knew I had a vague interest in global health and that as an engineering student, I wouldn’t have room to take many extra global health classes outside of the rigid engineering curriculum. During my first few weeks on campus, I prioritized joining GlobeMed over the hundreds of other student groups because of…
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Lessons From “Around the World”

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By Tamar Eisen The most common question I have heard after returning to Northwestern for winter quarter is, “How was the world?” The reason I am consistently asked this question is because last fall, I went on a semester-long comparative health program to India, South Africa and Brazil. While I did reach three continents, spent time in ten different cities, and got to experience three distinct cultures, I can still say that I barely scratched the surface of the world itself. Moreover, when I try to answer this question to a friend or professor, I usually do not have time to get into the complexities and intricacies of the state of these three countries, so I tend to settle with the response, “The world was good.” I guess now that…
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A freshman’s take on joining GlobeMed and going on GROW

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By Neil Thivalapill This will probably be a very disorganized post because I can’t organize my thoughts for the life of me. So, here it goes: GlobeMed. Level with me here, your club SOUNDS like it is filled with Pre-meds who want to save the world with their *expert medical knowledge* or at least convince medical schools that that’s what their end goal is. And I’ll admit, that was definitely a reason that I applied to GlobeMed. But damn, you guys did not fit that stereotype and I am so thankful you didn’t for essentially two reasons: I hate Pre-meds, and you guys have opened my eyes to the world of global health and social justice. My freshman experience at GlobeMed really did change me. It made me sadder but in a good way. I know that…
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ghU Recap: Voluntourism

globalhealthU, Uncategorized
By Amy Lin Last quarter, the ghU sessions delved into the topics of gender and sexuality. While the sessions were empowering and fun as a woman, it was easy to get swept up in the feminist movement and start saying things like “gender is a social construct” and “down with the patriarchy.” The ghUs addressed these topics, but went even further in discussing the surrounding social environment. We talked about the personal issues with acceptance and social norms, and then went on to shed a light on the larger implications of the inequalities, especially with regards to access to healthcare and other rights. While ghU’s always create dialogue about these important issues, the discussion often feels like it ends when the meeting ends. With our new focus on advocacy, it’s exciting…
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Voices On Transgender Community

Voices On Transgender Community

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By Elizabeth Kim This winter quarter’s GHUs at GlobeMed Northwestern has focused on gender and sexuality, of which transgender has been a topic of discussion. The overwhelming consensus in the discussions and in US classrooms is that there is not enough education regarding these issues, especially defining specific terms such as transgender, travestite, and transexual. Despite the general lack of information and understanding, recent events in the media have triggered conversations about the transgender community in the United States. On February 5, Barry Williams of the TV show Brady Brunch appeared in an interview on Huffington Post Live. Toward the end of the clip, Williams suggests he should go transgender as former Olympian and Kardashians father Bruce Jenner, who recently got a lot of publicity for a car accident, did…
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A History Of Failure: Why Global Health’s Past Is Important For Its Future

A History Of Failure: Why Global Health’s Past Is Important For Its Future

Global Health, Social Justice, Uncategorized
By Nida Bajwa Anyone who has studied global health knows that the field is wrought by many many failures, and very few successes. It is easy to get discouraged from the field when analyzing the immense amount of failure and repetition of those failures in the field. However, in analyzing these failed histories perhaps we can arrive at a greater future. As students, what is our role? What do we want to achieve from our global health education? How can we take a history of failures and turn it into success? The relationship between politics and global health is immense, and can be traced back to colonialism. The commonality that exists today is that healthcare to poor, developing countries is delivered by westerners who come in and impose their set…
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Guinea Worm Eradication in Nigeria, A Lesson To Learn From

Guinea Worm Eradication in Nigeria, A Lesson To Learn From

Global Health, Policy, Uncategorized
By Gordon Younkin You may have seen in the news a little over a year ago that the WHO declared Nigeria free of guinea-worm disease. While this may be considered old news, it is still worth examining the campaign that successfully stopped its transmission. Guinea-worm disease, also known as dracunculiasis, infects people via contaminated waterways, especially in slow-moving streams or stagnant pools. After entering the human body, it stays matures in its host without causing any symptoms for about a year before painfully emerging from the skin of the infected individual. It then releases thousands of larvae, and its life-cycle repeats. There is no vaccine or treatment for the disease—it is most effectively stopped through preventative measures such as water purification and behavioral change. In 1988, the Nigeria Guinea Worm…
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Co-Founder Reflects on GlobeMed Beginnings

Co-Founder Reflects on GlobeMed Beginnings

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By Alissa Zhu With more than 50 chapters spread across colleges and universities across North America, it’s hard to imagine less than a decade ago, GlobeMed was only an idea in Victor Roy’s head. GlobeMed co-founder Victor Roy Skyped in from the United Kingdom Sunday afternoon to converse with about 20 students. He spoke about the origins of GlobeMed and hosted a lively discussion on the future of global health engagement programs. When Victor was an undergraduate student at Northwestern in 2004, the global health program was still in its infancy. He and co-founder Peter Luckow were frustrated with the lack of options to make lasting and tangible change in impoverished communities around the world. They realized donating money and medical supplies wasn’t enough, and that a partnership was the…
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Learning from the Girls of Uganda

Learning from the Girls of Uganda

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By Amanda Blazek This past summer Neha, Rafa, and I comprised our GROW team. Every summer, the GROW team travels to the site of GlobeMed’s partner organization – the Adonai Child Development Centre in Namugoga, Uganda – to assess the status of previous fundraising initiatives, get to know the staff members at Adonai and the surrounding community, and carry out a research project. As three girls that went on the trip, we were interested in conducting a research project that related to assessing the wellbeing of girls. In Namugoga, as in much of Uganda and Sub Saharan Africa, there exists a large gender discrepancy in the education system, as boys attend and complete school at much higher rates than girls. We wanted to carry out a research project to examine…
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Putting Emotion Front and Center Once Again

Global Health, Public Health, Social Justice, Uncategorized
By Nicholas Wang We are inching closer to Article 25’s Day of Action on October 25. If all goes according to plan, it will be a monumental day for this brand new organization, which was founded within the past year by university students who had a simple idea for a grassroots global health advocacy organization. From that idea came the long, grueling process of formulating a tangible vision and plan for what this organization would look like and could accomplish. Long meetings both in person and over Google Hangout, hours upon hours of research and organization, aggressive network-building, and coordinated social media blitzes have all led up to a single day: October 25. There are events planned all over the world in more than 40 different countries with thousands of…
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