Public Health in Tel Aviv

Global Health, International, Public Health
By Jessica Hoffen As a GlobeMed member, I had sat through presentation after presentation on the many study abroad opportunities available, anxiously awaiting my chance to board an airplane and, briefly, wave goodbye to America.  My turn finally came in the spring of 2015 when I landed in Tel Aviv as part of the Public Health and Society in Israel program run by Northwestern and Tel Aviv University.  As a student interested in the impact of culture and conflict on health equity, I hoped that through experiencing this region I would be able to better understand what has worked and failed in implementing health initiatives across ethnic lines. While public health was the focus of my studies in the region I found that what Palestinians and Israelis were most passionate…
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Putting Emotion Front and Center Once Again

Global Health, Public Health, Social Justice, Uncategorized
By Nicholas Wang We are inching closer to Article 25’s Day of Action on October 25. If all goes according to plan, it will be a monumental day for this brand new organization, which was founded within the past year by university students who had a simple idea for a grassroots global health advocacy organization. From that idea came the long, grueling process of formulating a tangible vision and plan for what this organization would look like and could accomplish. Long meetings both in person and over Google Hangout, hours upon hours of research and organization, aggressive network-building, and coordinated social media blitzes have all led up to a single day: October 25. There are events planned all over the world in more than 40 different countries with thousands of…
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Vaccines, Herd Immunity, and Disease Re-Emergence – What’s the Deal?

Vaccines, Herd Immunity, and Disease Re-Emergence – What’s the Deal?

Domestic, Global Health, GlobeMed, International, Policy, Public Health
By Michael Zingman We hear about immunizations in the news. We are encouraged to get vaccinated. We hear friends and family talking about how they just “never got vaccinated” for something. We then hear about outbreaks and re-emergence of vaccine-preventable diseases. So what is causing this re-emergence exactly? Vaccines are one of the most crucial global health resources and are significant tools that can be utilized to protect large populations in both developed and developing nations from disease. Many diseases are vaccine-preventable, meaning if hypothetically everyone were to be vaccinated, the disease would become eradicated. One of such eradicable diseases is measles. Measles was once “eliminated” from the United States; however, recently, there has been extensive media coverage over a measles outbreak within the country. Measles was eliminated but not eradicated because of a slight minority of people…
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World AIDS Day

Domestic, Foreign Relations, Global Health, International, Public Health, Social Justice
To celebrate World AIDS Day, take a listen to the following inspirational StoryCorps presentation: http://www.npr.org/2012/11/30/166162027/a-lifes-ministry-springs-from-a-dilemma-over-aids For more coverage of the day's events, news, stories, and to get involved, visit http://www.worldaidsday.org/ In the spirit of giving, please consider donating to GlobeMed at Northwestern: http://www.globalgiving.org/projects/increase-public-health-and-sanitation-in-uganda/
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Public Health and Organic Food

Global Health, Nutrition, Public Health
Many of you may have heard that a recent study from Stanford researchers indicates that the health benefits of eating organic food are not as readily apparent as once thought, at least over a course of a few years (http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=1355685).  Utilizing over 200 peer-reviewed studies that examined both the differences between organic and non-organic food and the health of people who eat organic and non-organic food, researchers concluded that: "The published literature lacks strong evidence that organic foods are significantly more nutritious than conventional foods."  Reaction was widespread, but to make a gross generalization, many consumers were upset and felt duped or misled by companies advocating the benefits of organic food, which is often more expensive than comparable non-organic products.  After all, it only makes logical sense that putting more chemicals and…
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Malaria Vaccine Breakthrough: Implications for Global Health?

Global Health, International, Public Health
Malaria, transmitted by infected Anopheles mosquitoes, causes more than 780,000 deaths each year. The deaths occur disproportionately in Africa, particularly Sub-Saharan Africa. Conventional malaria prevention methods include insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS). Earlier this week, the results of a Phase III study in 7 African nations showed that RST,S/AS01 (vaccine against P. Falciparum - deadliest of the four malaria types) reduces the risk of severe malaria in children by 47 per cent. The drug is developed by GlaxoSmithKline in partnership with the PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative, and funded by the Gates Foundation. It has taken 24 years since the drug development process started to get to this point. What seems to be the world's first malaria vaccine is well under way, with final results expected in…
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Organization Spotlight: Tiyatien Health

Global Health, GlobeMed, International, Public Health, Social Justice
A worthy organization recently brought to the chapter's attention is Tiyatien Health, a not-for-profit that works to rebuild the failed health system of Liberia.  Liberia is still struggling to recover from a horrific civil war that ended in 2003. Tiyatien Health, headed by the liberian-born doctor Rajesh Panjabi, strives to provide what it terms "justice in health", health equity for all Liberians.  It focuses on providing free medicine and health care to those who need it. Rajesh and all involved place great importance on teaching Liberians how to care for themselves and administer to others in order to create a health system that won't only help those in need, but will sustain itself. Tiyatien also works with the Liberian Government to create a permanent, functioning health system and supports sustainable…
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A perspective from Paris

Foreign Relations, Global Health, International, Policy, Public Health
In many ways, Paris is not so different from New York, Chicago, or any major city in the United States. There are all the modern amenities, locals are chic and cosmopolitan and pop culture in Europe has largely molded itself around American media. The one thing people tend to point out is that the French tend to take their time to enjoy the ordinary. The lifestyle is slower, whether it’s how long it takes a waiter to bring over a check or the way Parisians linger over three-hour dinners of bread, wine, cheese and espresso even on weekdays. In time, I realized that this way of life reflects the lengthy scope of European history and, in turn, the principles around which many European societies are organized. Unlike the United States,…
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Wearing red on Dec. 1 World AIDS Day

GlobeMed, Grassroots Movements, Public Health
GlobeMed at Northwestern encourages everyone to recognize World AIDS Day this coming Wednesday, December 1. In America, someone is diagnosed with AIDS every 10 minutes. In South Africa, someone dies due to HIV or AIDS every 10 minutes. HIV/AIDS is often described as a disease of developing countries, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that at the end of 2006, there were 1.1 million HIV positive adults and adolescents in the US. In neighboring Chicago, In 2006, there were 21, 367 people living with HIV/AIDS in Chicago. In 2006, there were 754 new diagnosed AIDS cases in Chicago and 1,557 HIV cases. Among news diagnoses, 74% were male and 26% were female. Overall infection rates have declined by 20% in the last six years, but the rate among…
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