Guinea Worm Eradication in Nigeria, A Lesson To Learn From

Guinea Worm Eradication in Nigeria, A Lesson To Learn From

Global Health, Policy, Uncategorized
By Gordon Younkin You may have seen in the news a little over a year ago that the WHO declared Nigeria free of guinea-worm disease. While this may be considered old news, it is still worth examining the campaign that successfully stopped its transmission. Guinea-worm disease, also known as dracunculiasis, infects people via contaminated waterways, especially in slow-moving streams or stagnant pools. After entering the human body, it stays matures in its host without causing any symptoms for about a year before painfully emerging from the skin of the infected individual. It then releases thousands of larvae, and its life-cycle repeats. There is no vaccine or treatment for the disease—it is most effectively stopped through preventative measures such as water purification and behavioral change. In 1988, the Nigeria Guinea Worm…
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Vaccines, Herd Immunity, and Disease Re-Emergence – What’s the Deal?

Vaccines, Herd Immunity, and Disease Re-Emergence – What’s the Deal?

Domestic, Global Health, GlobeMed, International, Policy, Public Health
By Michael Zingman We hear about immunizations in the news. We are encouraged to get vaccinated. We hear friends and family talking about how they just “never got vaccinated” for something. We then hear about outbreaks and re-emergence of vaccine-preventable diseases. So what is causing this re-emergence exactly? Vaccines are one of the most crucial global health resources and are significant tools that can be utilized to protect large populations in both developed and developing nations from disease. Many diseases are vaccine-preventable, meaning if hypothetically everyone were to be vaccinated, the disease would become eradicated. One of such eradicable diseases is measles. Measles was once “eliminated” from the United States; however, recently, there has been extensive media coverage over a measles outbreak within the country. Measles was eliminated but not eradicated because of a slight minority of people…
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A perspective from Paris

Foreign Relations, Global Health, International, Policy, Public Health
In many ways, Paris is not so different from New York, Chicago, or any major city in the United States. There are all the modern amenities, locals are chic and cosmopolitan and pop culture in Europe has largely molded itself around American media. The one thing people tend to point out is that the French tend to take their time to enjoy the ordinary. The lifestyle is slower, whether it’s how long it takes a waiter to bring over a check or the way Parisians linger over three-hour dinners of bread, wine, cheese and espresso even on weekdays. In time, I realized that this way of life reflects the lengthy scope of European history and, in turn, the principles around which many European societies are organized. Unlike the United States,…
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Meeting with Dr. Atsu

GlobeMed, GROW Trip, H.O.P.E. Center, Ho, Ghana, Nutrition, Policy
“Ten years from now we will see this project grow out of the work of some students from the U.S. It will go beyond everyone’s dreams.” - Dr. Atsu, regional health director of Ho Municipality, in reference to the nutrition program at the H.O.P.E. Center On Monday, the GROW Team and Margaret met with Dr. Atsu, the new regional health director of the Ho Municipality. During this meeting we discussed the role that Ghana Health Service (GHS) should play at the HOPE Center and the partnership between GHS and GlobeMed. Going into the meeting, we were all really unsure about how receptive Dr. Atsu would be to our ideas, but we were all really pleased with what he had to say. Dr. Atsu sees Ghana Health Service playing a major…
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